News

Two Award-winning Posters at TN Psychological Assoc. Conference

Two research Posters by team members of the Life Paths Appalachian Research Center won awards at the October 30-31, 2015 Tennessee Psychological Association Convention at the Nashville Airport Marriott.  The University of the South, and particularly the Psychology Department, are Institutional Partners with the Center.

Elise Anderson ’16, a psychology major and Undergraduate Intern in the Center, was present to discuss the research;  this poster won second place for a poster with an undergraduate lead author.

Anderson, L. E.;  Blount, Z.;  Hagler, M.;  Grych, J.;  Banyard, V.;  & Hamby, S.  (2015, October).  The development of regulatory strengths from adolescence to middle adulthood.  Presented at the Tennessee Psychological Association Annual Conference, Nashville, TN.

  • Objective:  Self-regulation is the ability to maintain emotional, cognitive, and behavioral control, even during times of stress and adversity. The purpose of this study is to examine the pattern of five regulatory strengths (emotional regulation, emotional awareness, anger management, psychological endurance, and coping) over the lifespan and to explore sex differences among the strengths.
  • Method: 2565 participants (63.9% female) were recruited from rural communities to complete a computer survey. Participants responded to a series of questions about emotional awareness, emotional regulation, psychological endurance, anger management, and coping.
  • Results: Emotional regulation scores slightly declined from early to middle adolescence, but increased in late adolescence and emerging adulthood where it remained steady. Psychological endurance increased from late adolescence to the mid-20s, where it reached a plateau. Anger management showed increases from late adolescence to the mid-20s and from early through middle adulthood. Coping scores increased from middle adolescence to emerging adulthood.
  • Conclusion: Regulatory gains were noted through emerging adulthood and stability during middle adulthood. Regulatory strengths may be a promising target of prevention and intervention for youth and young adults.     View poster.

Zach Blount, formerly an Undergraduate Intern in the Center, is a member of the class of 2016 at Davidson College.

Matt Hagler ’13, formerly an Undergraduate Intern in the Center, majored in psychology at Sewanee.

Anna Segura-Montagut,  a graduate student at the University of Barcelona and a visiting staff member in the Center, was present to discuss the research;  this poster won second place for a poster with a graduate student lead author.

Segura-Montagut, A.;  Hamby, S.;  Grych, J.;  & Banyard, V.  (2015, October).  Meaning-making strengths across the lifespan.  Presented at the Tennessee Psychological Association Annual Conference, Nashville, TN.

  • Objective: To examine the pattern of seven meaning-making strengths (i.e., related to family care, morals standards, other-oriented, self-oriented, optimism, purpose, religious) across age and gender.
  • Method: 2565 participants (63.9% female) from rural Tennessee were recruited to complete a computer-administered survey. Participants responded to a series of questions about meaning-making strengths.
  • Results: Regression analyses showed that the presence of meaning-making strengths changes across the lifespan. In general, females showed greater levels of these strengths than males.
  • Conclusion: When building Resilience Portfolios, adolescents engage more in self-oriented meaning making practices, whereas adults are more likely to garner deeper meaning from their family relationships.     View poster.

Three members of the Life Paths Appalachian Research Center were coauthors of both posters.

Sherry Hamby, Ph.D.;  Principal Investigator.  She is Research Professor of Psychology at Sewanee.

Victoria Banyard, Ph.D.;   Co-investigator.  She is Professor of Psychology at the University of New Hampshire.

John Grych, Ph.D.;  Co-investigator.   He is Professor of Psychology and Chair, Marquette University.